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How does students’ choice of major, school affect first-year earnings? Georgetown report offers first-time look.

A new report from Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce sheds light on wide variation in the first-year earnings and loan debt of graduates across 37,000 college majors at 4,400 postsecondary institutions.

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October 16, 2020
Stranded credits stand between millions of former students and a college degree

Around 6.6 million former college students have earned academic credits that they can’t claim because their institution withholds transcripts in the event of an outstanding balance—and very few programs exist to help.

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October 16, 2020
Access to course materials another casualty of COVID-19

College students who can’t afford course materials and rely on library copies are struggling this fall as campus closures cut off library access and quarantines of print materials take resources out of circulation.

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October 16, 2020
Higher ed orgs condemn Trump administration’s order on diversity training

An executive order aimed at curtailing training on racial and gender bias has caused confusion at colleges and universities, prompting several to pause programming, and sparking an outcry from higher education associations.

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October 09, 2020
Georgetown report analyzes ‘dollars and sense’ of free-college plans

A new analysis from Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce looks at the costs of several free-college models, including the plan put forth by Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, finding that Biden’s plan would pay for itself within a decade.

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October 09, 2020
Common App drops disciplinary history question, pointing to racial disparities

The Common Application is removing a question about applicants’ high school disciplinary history, saying it is “inconsistent and inequitable and disproportionately impacting low-income and students of color.”

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October 09, 2020
Applicants from high schools with a ‘track record’ could have even bigger edge this year

While researching for his new book, Who Gets In and Why: A Year Inside College Admissions, journalist Jeffrey Selingo found that applicants from known “feeder” high schools tend to have a leg up—and could have an even bigger advantage this year as the pandemic upends typical admissions criteria.

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